Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

The Broads - then & now

183 posts in this topic

Posted · Report post

Hi Barry

You really do have some fabulous photos!

It is interesting that you spotted what appeared to be the bomb damage at Horning Ferry Inn in the photo from 1946. I'm not sure when it was actually re-built after the war, but suspect it may have been a few years ... sadly for it to burn down again in 1965! Interestingly, I read that the possible reason that Horning was bombed was due to the decoy lights which had been set up at various points around Norfolk to act as decoys to protect the airfileds and military runways ... i.e. they would effectively make a "dummy" runway usung lights to make the enemy think that they had got the right target.

The history of Broadland during WW2 is fascinating and, now that so many records have been released, it is something that I would like to investigate further for an article.... it's finding the time to do it!

With regard to the hire fleets after the war. I have had a look back through my notes - apparently Broadland was opened up to the public again in 1943 after the threat of a German invasion faded and Wally Hoseason actually began his hire agency in 1944. I don't have any notes on the 1946 brochures but Blakes 1947 were offering a choice of 400 yachts and motor cruisers for hire from 33 boatyards ... the pre war number had been 600. Of course petrol was still rationed at this time and cruising was limited to 120 miles per week.

I reply to Jonny's question about the changes at the Swan Inn at Horning. It would seem to have undergone several sets of changes during it's lifetime. It was built in 1897 during the Victorian holiday boom and I have pictures of it from 1903/04 on the website which shows that it originally had a brick facade .... the mock tudor black and white facade had appeared by the 1930s, although I haven't been able to pinpoint the exact date that happened. The major facelift that you can see in barry's photo from the early 1980s took place in 1979/80 when it recieved a £70k refurbishment. This also coincided with the arrival of Souther Comfort which had previously been operating from Wroxham. Link to a 1979 newspaper article about the changes at the Swan and Southern Comfort below:

http://www.broadlandmemories.co.uk/documents/news/news_70s/79_paddleboat_horning.JPG

Carol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

H.T. 'Percy' Percival , whos boatyard in Horning was building MTB's during the war, always maintained that the plane was attempting to hit searchlight battery on the village recreational ground

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Yet more interesting stuff! The article on the Southern Comfort interested me most actually - firstly because I had no idea it had been around for so long and secondly because it never ceases to amaze me some of the things people complain about!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Hi

This is a "The & Now" that I would love to get .... only I don't think I am likely to be able to unless I arrive at Wroxham at 6am on a sunny Sunday morning!! It was a commercial image which was used for postcards etc and I think dates from the 1930s. It illustrates one of the other difficuklties in re-creating old phtographs .... what were once much quieter streets, roads and lanes, are now extremely busy and dangerous! We had the same problem at Oulton trying to recreate a shot of Bridge street looking down towards OB North station. The road there in my 40s/50s photo was a quiet suburban street with no cars to be seen .... these days it's like the M25!! And the original picture had been taken from the middle of the road .... I did try to persuade Kev to get out there but he seemed reluctant for some reason!

I think the Wroxham picture below will cause similar problems but if you think you can have a go Simon (I am NEVER likely to be up early enough to do so), then please do .... although I will be after using the results on BM too! :)

Carol

post-500-136713454019_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

P.S. .... yes, I know it's actually looking across the bridge to Hoveton!

Carol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Carol when I eventually get around to doing this you are welcome to use any of the images on BM (provided they are any good of course!).

I admit I think it might not be until the Spring that I actually get around to doing it purely because of lighting, weather and other commitments in the time period leading up to Christmas and shortly after. That said, anyone at all reading this thread who fancies having a go is obviously free to do so.

If you want to stop the traffic in Wroxham just put on a high vis vest - people always do what they're told by folks wearing high vis vests. I would not, of course, condone such action.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Hi

Whilst searching for something else today, I came across some more details about the Ferry Inn at Horning. Apparently, it was 13 years before they rebuilt the pub after the bomb damage!!

Carol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Hi all, This picture was taken in 1949 in Oulton Broad for the Lowestoft Journal, the small boy (Bobbby Rudd) now in his 70s visited us last year while over fron Australia. The launches were Dads, not sure about the dingey, W63 was called 'Vivo'

Left to right were..

George Pigney, Robert(Bob) Richardson, Arthur Skitterall, Regie Bullen, Jimmy ?..?, Bobby Rudd, Bert Gooch, Arthur Wigg, Arthur Moor.

Sorry about the copy it is off a piece of paper with 3 folds in it!

cheers..

post-503-136713454041_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Lovely period photo Clive, you just don't seem to see those weathered expressive faces anymore, or maybe i don't look.

I think I shall move on to Ranworth in the then and nows, everyone appears to love the place, I wonder if because from the staithe you have this wide open vista, which I don't think you get anywhere else from a mooring, at least not of this length. Please correct me if you can think of anywhere else.

These three pictures are almost the same taken over a twelve year period from the first in 1959 second the mid fifties and the third in 1947. You will notice the complete lack of moorings to the left of the pictures, I guess these started to appear in the seventies when private craft were starting to increase. Int he fifties and sixties it was quite rare to see a private boat, and generally quite exiting. What we now know as the Island did not exist as a mooring, I don't know when it was developed but I don't seem to recall it in the seventies or early eighties, but someone will put me straight I am sure.

post-133-136713455081_thumb.jpg

post-133-136713455372_thumb.jpg

post-133-13671345538_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

The aerial shot maybe a little difficult for you to replicate Simon, unless you are lucky enough like me to have had an eighty year old flying father. This was taken in 1987/88 the last boat on what was then Peter Mills' moorings was Springsong after which my forum name. We at this time had The Ship just up the road in South Walsham. I have some aerial photos of South Walsham mainly of The Ship, I must look them out and post them up if anyone is interested.Thinking about this my friend still flies a 1940s' piper cub, it saw service in the war as a spotter plane the whole cabin side clips up onto the high wing and the passenger sits in the front a la Tiger Moth, the fuel gauge is a wire on a cork floating in the tank in front of the screen. This plane is beloved of photographers because of its very slow speed flat out at about eighty, so with a good headwind it just about hovvers I remember some odd looks from hire boats we used to hovver over. Sorry went off course a little there. Anyway he did offer to take me up again, that would be something to aim for, if Douglas Bader did why not me.

These three pictures were all taken from more or less the same spot in 1959 / 1962 and 1976 little appears to have changed apart from the moorings starting to appear in the 1976 photo.

post-133-136713455386_thumb.jpg

post-133-136713455392_thumb.jpg

post-133-136713455397_thumb.jpg

post-133-136713455678_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

spectacular pics once again Barry its like looking into another time zone

did you have a sausage dog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Yes Jonny we had two Daschunds over the years this is the 1939 model on board Golden Eagle.

post-133-136713455685_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Great photos again Barry,

There used to be a 'Windboat' similar to the one in your previous Picture of Ranworth, she was moored near Wroxham bridge years ago in the cut between the Hotel Wroxham and the car park opposite the Chineese which you cant park in now! I wonder what happened to her....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Hi Clive

That would be Nocturn used to be in Ralph Englishs' fleet , she belonged to a friend of mine Guy, he died I believe about five years ago, I lost touch with him whilst away from Norfolk. I have been told he sold her to somewhere in Wales after he stopped living on her, I really must try and find out what happened to him and her. There used to be a few around but there only seems to be Cassandra left now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

dosnt like the smell of those Wellingtons :-D :naughty: :-D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Barry,

How do you mean there is only Cassandra left now, do you mean of that particular class?

we have had Brookwind in our wet shed for the last 17 years, Bubblegap was in amazing when she left the shed but that was a few years ago now, I think she is in Loddon now, we also have one called 'Muddy Waters' I am not sure what she was but is about 32ft? bright varnished and mid restoration looking fantastic.

there is Merrywind with riverside boat sales and Lady Berol in Southampton (that is off the top of my head) I also remember one at Native yacht Co in Brundall a few years ago, she was in good nick but needed finishing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Clive

Springsong Nocturn Cassandra were all 1930s Graham Bunn designs the ones Merry wind Pour toi Bubble etc were all later I think Rip Martin designs from the late forties and fifties.I am fairly sure by the time these were built Hagenbach owned Windboats. Brookwind of course is one of the early ones she was the larger version of Springsong and I think since Broadwind was broken up in the eighties she is the last one, at least that I know of.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

A bulkhead from broadwind lives on in Brookwind from when she was broken! the owner of Broadwind abandoned her owing monies but returned to remove the engine through the side of the hull while she was on hard standing!

I understand now regarding the originals.

cheers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Going back to an earlier discussion about the wartime bombing raid which destroyed Horning Ferry Inn .... I have found the information source that I referred to. In Robert Maltsters "Norfolk & Suffolk Broads" book he mentions that it seems likely that the bombs were aimed at Percivals boatyard which was building craft for the Royal Navy at that time. However, he also mentions that he had spoken to an aeronautical historian, Huby Fairhead, who pointed out that Horning was the site of one of three "Starfish" decoy sites which were designed to draw the enemy aircraft away from Norwich. When activated the lights and fires resembled the Midland & Great Northern Station yard at Norwich, and the Horning site was in operation on the night of that bombing raid.

Apparently 15 bombs were dropped during that raid ... only four caused damage, the rest landing in the surrounding fields and marshes. Amongst the fatalities at the pub were several pilots and servicemen who were based at RAF Coltishall and five people who had fled Yarmouth in an attempt to escape the bombing there.

The fire which destroyed the replacement Ferry Inn in 1965 was caused by a chimney fire which set the thatch alight.

Carol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Decoys make sense but putting one actually in a village seems a little odd. cheers for the info Carol, very interesting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Hi

This is a picture of the Ferry Inn at Horning taken in 1941 after that devestating raid. It does seem strange that they would place a decoy sight so close to a village.

Carol

post-500-136713473626_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Hi Carol

thanks for the pic that looked like a wreck

Jonny ice sliceice slice

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I suspect that, a lot of the time, the German pilots ditched their bombs anywhere they could. The quicker they could get rid of them, the sooner they could go home. If something looked anything like a worthy target from the air, they would probably go for it.

Regards

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I agree Steve, as I did post on another thread, HT 'Percy' Percival did tell me that he reckoned that they were ditching their bombs and had a go at the searchlight battery on Horning recreation ground rather than the Ferry or the Sheds he built the MTB's in as they would have been in darkness

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Hi

I don't suppose that we will ever know the real reason how and why the bombs were dropped over Horning on that night. The possible reasons I mentioned above are not my theories by the way ... as I said, they were quoted from Robert Malsters book and were based on his own research and discussions with local historians.

Carol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0